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2006
ACM

Being watched or being special: how I learned to stop worrying and love being monitored, surveilled, and assessed

11 years 1 months ago
Being watched or being special: how I learned to stop worrying and love being monitored, surveilled, and assessed
This paper explores the relationship between display of feedback (public vs. private) by a computer system and the basis for evaluation (present vs. absent) of that feedback. We employ a social interpersonal context (speed-dating) in a controlled laboratory setting. Participants (in male-female pairs) receive real-time performance feedback, either only about themselves (private) or about both participants (public). Participant perceptions of monitoring, conformity, and self-consciousness about themselves and their dating partner, as well as perceptions of system invasiveness, system competence, and system support are assessed. There is a consistent pattern of significant interaction between feedback display and basis for evaluation conditions. Public feedback with an added, trivial basis for evaluation creates significantly lower perceptions of monitoring, conformity, self-consciousness, and system invasiveness, than do the other three conditions. Additionally, there is a main effect ...
Erica Robles, Abhay Sukumaran, Kathryn Rickertsen,
Added 30 Nov 2009
Updated 30 Nov 2009
Type Conference
Year 2006
Where CHI
Authors Erica Robles, Abhay Sukumaran, Kathryn Rickertsen, Clifford Nass
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