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MEMOCODE
2006
IEEE

Latency-insensitive design and central repetitive scheduling

9 years 7 months ago
Latency-insensitive design and central repetitive scheduling
The theory of latency-insensitive design (LID) was recently invented to cope with the time closure problem in otherwise synchronous circuits and programs. The idea is to allow the inception of arbitrarily fixed (integer) latencies for data/signals traveling along wires or communication media. Then mechanisms such as shell wrappers and relay-stations are introduced to “implement” the necessary back-pressure congestion control, so that data with shorter travel duration can safely await others when they are to be consumed simultaneously by the same computing element. These mechanisms can themselves be efficiently represented as synchronous components in this global, asynchronously-spirited environment. Despite their efficient form, relay-stations and back-pressure mechanisms add complexity to a system whose behaviour is ultimately very repetitive. Indeed, the ”slowest” data loops regulate the traffic and organize the traffic to their pace. This specific repetitive schedulin...
Julien Boucaron, Robert de Simone, Jean-Vivien Mil
Added 12 Jun 2010
Updated 12 Jun 2010
Type Conference
Year 2006
Where MEMOCODE
Authors Julien Boucaron, Robert de Simone, Jean-Vivien Millo
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