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RECOMB
2006
Springer

Sorting by Weighted Reversals, Transpositions, and Inverted Transpositions

10 years 4 months ago
Sorting by Weighted Reversals, Transpositions, and Inverted Transpositions
Abstract. During evolution, genomes are subject to genome rearrangements that alter the ordering and orientation of genes on the chromosomes. If a genome consists of a single chromosome (like mitochondrial, chloroplast or bacterial genomes), the biologically relevant genome rearrangements are (1) inversions--also called reversals--where a section of the genome is excised, reversed in orientation, and reinserted and (2) transpositions, where a section of the genome is excised and reinserted at a new position in the genome; if this also involves an inversion, one speaks of an inverted transposition. To reconstruct ancient events in the evolutionary history of organisms, one is interested in finding an optimal sequence of genome rearrangements that transforms a given genome into another genome. It is well known that this problem is equivalent to the problem of "sorting" a signed permutation into the identity permutation. The complexity of the problem is still unknown. The best p...
Martin Bader, Enno Ohlebusch
Added 03 Dec 2009
Updated 03 Dec 2009
Type Conference
Year 2006
Where RECOMB
Authors Martin Bader, Enno Ohlebusch
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