Sciweavers

11
Voted
WG
1999
Springer

Finding Smallest Supertrees Under Minor Containment

13 years 7 months ago
Finding Smallest Supertrees Under Minor Containment
The diversity of application areas relying on tree-structured data results in wide interest in algorithms which determine differences or similarities among trees. One way of measuring the similarity between trees is to find the smallest common superstructure or supertree, where common elements are typically defined in terms of a mapping or embedding. In the simplest case, a supertree will contain exact copies of each input tree, so that for each input tree, each vertex of a tree can be mapped to a vertex in the supertree such that each edge maps to the corresponding edge. More general mappings allow for the extraction of more subtle common elements captured by looser definitions of similarity. We consider supertrees under the general mapping of minor containment. Minor containment generalizes both subgraph isomorphism and topological embedding; as a consequence of this generality, however, it is NP-complete to determine whether or not G is a minor of H, even for general trees. By ...
Naomi Nishimura, Prabhakar Ragde, Dimitrios M. Thi
Added 05 Aug 2010
Updated 05 Aug 2010
Type Conference
Year 1999
Where WG
Authors Naomi Nishimura, Prabhakar Ragde, Dimitrios M. Thilikos
Comments (0)