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PERSUASIVE
2007
Springer

The Behavior Chain for Online Participation: How Successful Web Services Structure Persuasion

13 years 8 months ago
The Behavior Chain for Online Participation: How Successful Web Services Structure Persuasion
The success of many online services today depends on the company’s ability to persuade users to take specific actions, such as registering or inviting friends. We examined over 50 popular Web services of this kind to understand the influence processes and strategies used. We found that successful online services share a pattern of target behaviors that can be viewed as part of an overall framework. We call this framework the “Behavior Chain for Online Participation.” This paper briefly presents the general idea of a behavior chain and applies it to understanding persuasion patterns found online. We then illustrate the Behavior Chain for Online Participation by applying it to the Web service LinkedIn and other popular services. Future research may identify behavior chains in other domains and develop new research methods for validating behavior chains.
B. J. Fogg, Dean Eckles
Added 09 Jun 2010
Updated 09 Jun 2010
Type Conference
Year 2007
Where PERSUASIVE
Authors B. J. Fogg, Dean Eckles
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